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The Equine Herpesviruses

  • Dennis J. O’Callaghan
  • Glenn A. Gentry
  • Charles C. Randall
Part of the The Viruses book series (VIRS)

Abstract

The equine herpesviruses comprise a diverse group of three antigenically distinct biological agents of protean manifestation in the horse, causing a variety of natural infections that vary from the subclinical to fatal generalized disease. Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1), also known as equine abortion virus (EAV), or equine rhinopneumonitis virus, is a major cause of respiratory disease and abortion in the horse. This agent, in particular, appears to be a model system for in vitro and in vivo study of disease, persistent infection, biochemistry of viral infection, and biochemical and oncogenic transformation. This review will therefore emphasize certain biological features of this equine herpesvirus, the best studied of the group. Equine herpesvirus type 2 (EHV-2), or equine cytomegalovirus (ECMV), is a ubiquitous, loosely defined, antigenically heterogeneous, usually slowly growing group of viruses, causing no known disease. Equine herpesvirus type 3 (EHV-3), equine coital exanthema (ECE) virus, is the causative agent of a relatively mild progenital exanthema of both mare and stallion.

Keywords

Oncogenic Transformation Equine Herpesvirus Equine Influenza Virus Hamster Embryo Cell Defective Interfere 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis J. O’Callaghan
    • 1
  • Glenn A. Gentry
    • 1
  • Charles C. Randall
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of Mississippi Medical CenterJacksonUSA

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