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The Measurement of Skeletal Maturation

  • Alex F. Roche
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 30)

Abstract

Human biologists usually apply the term “maturity” to level of maturity; that is, the extent to which an individual, or a group of individuals, has proceeded towards adulthood. Therefore, maturation is a particular type of development: development that proceeds to the same end point in all individuals. In this sense, measures relative to adult size for the same individual, for example, present stature as a percentage of actual or predicted adult stature, are measures of maturity. The measurement of skeletal maturity is based on the recognition of maturity indicators; these are visible changes or stages that occur during maturation.

Keywords

Maturity Level Skeletal Maturity Skeletal Maturation Mature Grade Maturity Score 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alex F. Roche
    • 1
  1. 1.Fels Research Institute and Department of PediatricsWright State University School of MedicineYellow SpringsUSA

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