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Research Design and Sample Selection in Studies of Growth and Development

  • Francis E. Johnston
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 30)

Abstract

The study of human growth and development is an integral part of the scientific study of human biological structure, function and diversity. Consequently, the research upon which our knowledge is based must be firmly established in the methodology of science and must reflect that set of attitudes and approaches which has come to be known as the scientific method. Just as with any research, the success or failure of a growth study depends ultimately upon the quality of the research design. As used here, research design involves all steps which lead from the formulation of an initial question, through the development of a series of procedures which will provide an appropriate data base and the analysis of that base, to the interpretation of the analysis and the extension of the interpretation from the immediate to the general. Each step is crucial and none can be ignored or treated lightly. Good research requires detailed planning, careful consideration of alternatives, and strict attention to the rules of both logic and objectivity.

Keywords

Research Design Longitudinal Design Growth Study Protein Energy Malnutrition High Hemoglobin Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francis E. Johnston
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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