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Molecular Resonance Phenomena

  • J. N. Bardsley

Abstract

Resonant scattering theory has been developed over more than fifty years. Its application in molecular physics began in earnest in 19621 although there were earlier treatments of predissociation,2 dissociative recombination3 and electron attachment4 that contained some elements of the theory. There are two features of the theory as applied in atomic and molecular physics that are not so important in other fields. Firstly, since the non-relativistic Hamiltonian is known, one should be able to calculate the resonance parameters, such as the position and width, from first principles and not treat them solely as empirical parameters. Secondly, in studies of molecular resonant states one would like to incorporate the Born-Oppenheimer separation of electronic and nuclear motion into the definition of the resonances and the computational algorithms.

Keywords

Resonance Parameter Resonant State Vibrational Excitation Electron Collision Nuclear Motion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. N. Bardsley
    • 1
  1. 1.Physics & Astronomy DepartmentUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA

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