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Ignition of Polymers

  • Bernard Miller
  • J. Ronald Martin

Abstract

For a polymer to ignite, it must first decompose. While low-molecular-weight condensed materials may produce volatile combustible species through sublimation or evaporation processes, one of the fundamental characteristics of the genus polymer is the lack of a boiling point. Thus, the only mechanism by which volatiles can be produced from a pure polymer must be some form of partial or complete thermal decomposition.

Keywords

Cotton Fabric Flame Retardant Sample Mass Ignition Time Ignition Delay Time 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bernard Miller
    • 1
  • J. Ronald Martin
    • 1
  1. 1.Textile Research InstitutePrincetonUSA

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