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Detection of Specific Antigen in SV40-Transformed Cells by Immunofluorescence

  • John H. Pope
  • Wallace P. Rowe
Part of the Milestones in Current Research book series (MCR)

Abstract

Immunofluorescent techniques have been used by several investigators to study the replication of SV40 virus (1–3); in all cases, antiviral immune serum was used, which would detect antigens on the surface of the viral particle. In African green monkey kidney cell cultures (AGMK) infected with SV40 virus, viral antigen appeared in the nucleus at 18 hours and reached a peak at 38 hours, after which nuclear antigen decreased and a cytoplasmic stage occurred (1). Nuclear fluorescence was also observed 10 days after infection of cells of grivet monkey kidney, rhesus monkey kidney, human embryo kidney, and Syrian hamster kidney (2). The same techniques were applied to cells transformed by SV40 virus in a search for evidence of viral antigen. Faint nuclear fluorescence, interpreted as non-specific, was observed in transformed Syrian hamster kidney cells (2). In cultures of transformed human embryo kidney cells, which were producing virus, less than 0.1 per cent of cells showed nuclear fluorescence (3) and it seems probable that these were the cells responsible for virus replication.

Keywords

African Green Monkey Kidney SV40 Virus African Green Monkey Kidney Cell Nuclear Fluorescence Normal Hamster 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • John H. Pope
  • Wallace P. Rowe

There are no affiliations available

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