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Presence of Cell and Virus Specific Sequences in the Same Molecules of Nuclear RNA from Virus Transformed Cells

  • Randolph Wall
  • James E. Darnell
Part of the Milestones in Current Research book series (MCR)

Abstract

Hybridization studies show that nuclear RNA in transformed cells contains both host and virus specific sequences. This suggests virus-specific mRNA could be formed by selective cleavage of high molecular weight nuclear RNA.

Keywords

Blank Filter Selective Cleavage SV3T3 Cell Polysomal mRNA Sucrose Gradient Sedimentation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Randolph Wall
  • James E. Darnell

There are no affiliations available

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