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An Evolutionary Perspective on Infant Intelligence: Species Patterns and Individual Variations

  • Sandra Scarr-Salapatek

Abstract

Any attempt to construct an evolutionary view of infant intelligence should raise a certain skepticism in the reader’s mind. What, after all, is the nature of intelligence in infancy? And how shall the validity of an evolutionary account be judged? Not, certainly, by its predictive power for the future evolution of infant behavior! On the first question I shall defer largely to Piaget (1952), whose descriptions and explanations of infant intelligence I find consistent with an evolutionary view. On the second question, a few words about evolutionary theory may be helpful.

Keywords

Evolutionary Perspective Human Infant Infant Development Lactase Activity Species Pattern 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandra Scarr-Salapatek
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MinnesotaUSA

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