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RoManSy 6 pp 642-651 | Cite as

Structure Strategy Problem on a Redundant Manipulator

  • H. Asama
  • M. Onosato
  • H. Yoshikawa

Summary

Structure strategy is discussed concerning kinematic geometry of manipulator structure, which is a strategy to synthesize motion of a redundant manipulator developed for the purpose of automation of maintenance tasks in complicated and restricted environments. The motion synthesis process is considered as a planning flow in several subsystems. Subsystems for several phases of planning are presented, which synthesize manipulator motion according to the task commands from human operators to be fulfilled as a whole. Subsystems consist of an element task planning system, a trajectory planning system, a performance evaluation system, and an environment model system which provides the environment information. An integrated manipulator motion synthesis system is proposed for synthetic planning of the manipulator motion. It includes a knowledge base describing experience and knowhow, and is linked with CAD/CAM or sensors providing design information, manufacturing information, and information about the states of objects and obstacles. Examples of structure strategy to plan the manipulator’s motion determining the redundant parameters’ motion are shown to verify the effectiveness of motion inference applying knowledge engineering.

Keywords

Maintenance Task Redundant Manipulator Element Task Motion Synthesis Maintenance Manipulator 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    Yoshikawa, H.: “Necessity and Potential of Maintenance Technology — Automation of Maintenance —,” 7th European Federation of National Maintenance Society, Venice, May 1984.Google Scholar
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    Arai, T., et al.: “A Stair-Climbing Robot for Maintenance: ‘A MOOTY’,” Seminar on Remote Handling Equipment for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, Harwell, UK, Oct. 1984.Google Scholar
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    Asama, H., Yoshikawa, H.: “Development of a Metamorphic Manipulator with 9 Degrees of Freedom,” Proc. of 15th ISIR, pp. 415–422, Tokyo, Sep. 1985.Google Scholar
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    Takeshige, A., Tomiyama, T., Yoshikawa, H.: “An application of Frame System to CAD,” in V. Hubka & Programme Committee (ed.), Theory and Practice of Enginnering Design in International Comparison, Heuriste, pp. 763–770, Zurich, 1985.Google Scholar
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    Tomiyama, T., Yoshikawa, H.: “Requirements and Principles for Intelligent CAD Systems,” in J. S. Gero (ed.), Knowledge Engineering in Computer-Aided Design, pp. 1–23, Amsterdam, 1985.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Hermes, Paris 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Asama
    • 1
  • M. Onosato
    • 1
  • H. Yoshikawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Precision Machinery Engineering, Faculty of Engineeringthe University of TokyoTokyoJapan

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