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Computer aided production management

  • D. A. Milner
  • V. C. Vasiliou

Abstract

Computer aided production management (CAPM) is a term used to refer to all aspects of computer application in production, as well as interfaces between production and marketing, design and finance. Whatever other objectives a manufacturing company may have, its two perpetual shortterm objectives are likely to be obtaining orders and executing them to the satisfaction of the customers. CAPM is applied in order to execute customers’ orders efficiently and economically. Its main concerns are therefore:
  1. 1)

    knowing at all times what delivery dates can be offered realistically, taking into account existing commitments;

     
  2. 2)

    planning future capacity to meet sales opportunities;

     
  3. 3)

    ensuring that the right materials are ordered;

     
  4. 4)

    ensuring that work-in-progress proceeds through the manufacturing stages in the right sequence;

     
  5. 5)

    providing flexibility to meet changing customer requirements or priorities without incurring excessive inventory.

     

Keywords

Component Code Material Requirement Planning Master Production Schedule Master Schedule High Level Demand 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© D A Milner and V C Vasiliou 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. A. Milner
  • V. C. Vasiliou

There are no affiliations available

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