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Machinery Management

  • Ralph Alcock

Abstract

Machinery management is recognized as being important in reducing the cost of crop production. For example, Ozkan and Edwards (1983) state that “in Iowa, owning and operating agricultural machinery comprises 31 and 43 percent, respectively, of the total non-land costs of corn and soybean production” (p. 2). Von Bargen and Cunney (1974) suggested that over one-third of crop production costs can be attributed to machinery operation. There are, however, obvious difficulties inherent in any proposal to determine machinery requirements. The selection of farm machinery, and decisions relating to replacement will be based on some economic criteria, and yet the absolute cost of a machine can only be determined after its replacement. This means that although we cannot be specific in presenting machinery selection criteria, reasonable estimations can be made.

Keywords

Cost Curve Group Replacement Machine Capacity Negative Exponential Distribution Farm Machinery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The AVI Publishing Company, Inc. 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralph Alcock
    • 1
  1. 1.Agricultural Engineering DepartmentSouth Dakota State UniversityBrookingsUSA

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