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Cherries

  • Benjamin J. E. Teskey
  • James S. Shoemaker

Abstract

Botanically, cherries (like peaches) are drupe fruits. Hortieulturally, the two main types of cherries are sweet (Prunus avium) and pie, tart or sour (P. cerasus). There are also two main groups of both sweet and sour cherries, as well as a separate Duke group (P. avium × P. cerasus, and vice versa). The terms red, pitted red, red pitted, tart and pie cherry are preferred for P. cerasus because the term sour tends to be somewhat of a handicap to the industry.

Keywords

Cover Crop Sweet Cherry Soluble Solid Content Sour Cherry Fruit Firmness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Avi Publishing Company, Inc. 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin J. E. Teskey
    • 1
  • James S. Shoemaker
    • 2
  1. 1.Horticultural Science Ontario Agricultural CollegeUniversity of GuelphGuelphCanada
  2. 2.Agricultural Experiment StationUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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