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Peaches

  • Benjamin J. E. Teskey
  • James S. Shoemaker

Abstract

Botanically, the fruit of the peach (Prunus persico) is a drupe. It develops entirely from a superior ovary, and consists of the outer portion, or skin (exocarp), the middle portion (mesocarp) of the ovary wall, which becomes fleshy, and the inner portion (endocarp), which becomes hard and forms the stone.

Keywords

Cover Crop Cold Hardiness Peach Fruit Peach Tree Ground Color 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Avi Publishing Company, Inc. 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin J. E. Teskey
    • 1
  • James S. Shoemaker
    • 2
  1. 1.Horticultural Science Ontario Agricultural CollegeUniversity of GuelphGuelphCanada
  2. 2.Agricultural Experiment StationUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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