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Apples

  • Benjamin J. E. Teskey
  • James S. Shoemaker

Abstract

Many different fruits and vegetables have been known as “apples.” The fleshy fruit referred to in this book is the major deciduous tree fruit of North America and of the world. The term “pomology,” the science of fruit production, comes from the apple, a pome.

Keywords

Apple Tree Apple Orchard Fruit Color Apple Cultivar Fruit Abscission 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Avi Publishing Company, Inc. 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin J. E. Teskey
    • 1
  • James S. Shoemaker
    • 2
  1. 1.Horticultural Science Ontario Agricultural CollegeUniversity of GuelphGuelphCanada
  2. 2.Agricultural Experiment StationUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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