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The design of sensors for a mobile teleoperator robot

  • C. M. Witkowski
  • A. H. Bond
  • M. Burton

Abstract

This paper describes the Queen Mary College Artificial Intelligence Laboratory Mark 5 mobile computer-controlled robot, a teleoperator device with dual six-degree-of-freedom manipulators. The article concentrates on a comprehensive sensor system incorporating both hardware and software. It shows the design of a gripper with several different sensory modalities and describes in some detail an object and obstacle detection system that uses both the reflection and the transmission of infrared light. Up to 256 individual sensors may be supported on a bus structure that gives a number of advantages over earlier designs.

Keywords

Industrial Robot Sensor Design Proximity Sensor Queen Mary College Vehicle Base 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Crane Russak & Company Inc 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. M. Witkowski
    • 1
  • A. H. Bond
    • 1
  • M. Burton
    • 1
  1. 1.The Artificial Intelligence Laboratory Department of Computer Science and StatisticsQueen Mary CollegeLondonUK

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