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Studies on the Effects of 60-Hz Electric and Magnetic Fields on Neuroendocrine Circadian Rhythmicity in Nonhuman Primates

  • Walter R. Rogers
  • Anthony M. Coelho
  • Stephen P. Easley
  • Jeffrey H. Lucas
  • Gary T. Moore
  • John L. Orr
  • Houston D. Smith
  • Curtis P. White
Part of the Circadian Factors in Human Health and Performance book series (CFHH)

Abstract

Wilson et al. (1981, 1983, 1986) demonstrated that exposure of rats to electric fields for 3 weeks both reduces, by about 50%, the amplitude of the nocturnal peak in melatonin production by the pineal gland and delays, by about 2 hours, the time of peak melatonin production. Semm (1983), Welker et al. (1983), and Olcese and Reuss (1986) have demonstrated magnetic field effects on pineal melatonin synthesis in rodents.

Keywords

Nonhuman Primate Pineal Gland Field Exposure Magnetic Field Effect Magnetic Field Exposure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Boston 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Walter R. Rogers
  • Anthony M. Coelho
  • Stephen P. Easley
  • Jeffrey H. Lucas
  • Gary T. Moore
  • John L. Orr
  • Houston D. Smith
  • Curtis P. White

There are no affiliations available

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