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Operant Response Rate as a Function of Time of Day and Early Electromagnetic Exposure on Rats Tested as Adults

  • Steven J. Freimark
  • Kurt Salzinger
  • Malcolm McCullough
  • Donald Phillips
  • Leo Birenbaum
Part of the Circadian Factors in Human Health and Performance book series (CFHH)

Abstract

This chapter is a follow-up of work (Salzinger et al., 1987; Salzinger et al, 1990) on rats exposed to 60-Hz electromagnetic fields (ELF) or to a sham condition, in utero plus the first 8 days after birth (a total of 30 days). The rats were conditioned as adults on a multiple random interval schedule of reinforcement. All rats eventually responded at different rates on the different schedules and the ELF rats responded at significantly lower rates that the sham rats. This effect survived extinction, the suspension of conditioning, and more than a month of additional conditioning. By the end of the additional conditioning, the rats varied in age from 287 to 296 days of age, approximately 30% of the life span of the average rat.

Keywords

Original Training Random Interval Operant Conditioning Chamber Sham Condition Additional Conditioning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Boston 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven J. Freimark
  • Kurt Salzinger
  • Malcolm McCullough
  • Donald Phillips
  • Leo Birenbaum

There are no affiliations available

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