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Introduction

  • Martin C. Moore-Ede
  • Scott S. Campbell
  • Russel J. Reiter
Part of the Circadian Factors in Human Health and Performance book series (CFHH)

Abstract

The biological effects of man-made electromagnetic fields and their consequences for human health are receiving increasing scientific attention and have become the subject of a vigorous public debate. This has been stimulated by the increasing concern in recent years about the effects of human exposure to these artificial electromagnetic fields (EMF). A number of reports have suggested that the incidence for certain types of cancer might be increased in individuals exposed to EMF. Yet for all the intensity of public debate there is relatively little hard data available nor the development of any scientific consensus on what pathophysiological mechanisms might be involved.

Keywords

Electromagnetic Field Alternate Current Field Exposure Electric Power Research Institute Magnetic Field Exposure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Boston 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin C. Moore-Ede
  • Scott S. Campbell
  • Russel J. Reiter

There are no affiliations available

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