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The Patient with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia

  • Robert Adam

Abstract

A 15-year-old girl presented to the emergency room with a complaint of headaches, excessive sweating, and palpitations. The headaches were severe and lasted about 10 minutes. They were accompanied by profuse truncal sweating palpitations, and chest pain (at the height of the attack).

On physical exam the girl was noted to have puffy lips and multiple mucosal neuromas on the eyelids, lips, and tongue. Her neck revealed lymphadenopathy and an enlarged thyroid gland. The mandible was prominent, and marfanoid habitus was observed. She was thin, anxious, and sweating. Her pupils were dilated, and her hands were tremulous.

Keywords

Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Islet Cell Tumor Autosomal Dominant Trait Osteitis Fibrosa 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Boston 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Adam

There are no affiliations available

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