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The Relationship Between Sleep Spindles and Spike-and-Wave Bursts in Human Epilepsy

  • P. Kellaway
  • J. D. FrostJr.
  • J. W. Crawley

Abstract

The concept that thalamocortical projection systems may be the substrate for the elaboration of generalized spike-and-wave activity was first expressed by Jasper and Kershman in 1941. Subsequently, Jasper and Droogleever-Fortuyn (1947) found that cortical spike-and-wave complexes could be elicited by stimulating the intralaminar system of the thalamus, a system that has been shown to be the primary substrate for the generation of sleep spindles (Domich et al., 1986; Steriade et al., 1986). In a systematic series of experiments, Gloor and his associates (see Chapter 14) have shown that in the feline penicillin model of generalized epilepsy (FPGE), cortical spike-and-wave discharges are dependent on the thalamocortical systems involved in the generation of sleep spindles.

Keywords

NREM Sleep Generalize Epilepsy Nocturnal Sleep Sleep Spindle Wave Discharge 
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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Boston, Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Kellaway
  • J. D. FrostJr.
  • J. W. Crawley

There are no affiliations available

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