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Extinction Limits for Premixed Laminar Flames in a Stagnation Point Flow

  • V. Giovangigli
  • M. D. Smooke
Part of the Progress in Scientific Computing book series (PSC, volume 7)

Abstract

Conclusions derived from the solution of premixed laminar flames in a stagnation point flow are important in the determination of chemically controlled extinction limits, in the ability to characterize the combustion processes occurring in turbulent flames and in the study of pollutant formation. Experimentally these flames can be produced by a single reactant stream impinging on an adiabatic wall or by two counterflowing reactant streams emerging from two coaxial jets. In the neighborhood of the stagnation point produced by these flows, a chemically reacting boundary layer is established. Along the stagnation point streamline the governing equations can be reduced to a system of coupled nonlinear two-point boundary value problems. In the single reactant stream configuration only one reaction zone is produced. If the exit velocity and the equivalence ratio of the fuel-air mixture of each jet are equal, then in the two reactant stream problem a double flame is produced with a plane of symmetry through the stagnation point and parallel to the two jets (see Figure 1).

Keywords

Equivalence Ratio Lewis Number Premix Flame Laminar Flame Extinction Limit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Boston 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. Giovangigli
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. D. Smooke
    • 3
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Mécanique ThéoriqueUniversité ParisChatenay-MalabryFrance
  2. 2.Laboratoire d’EnergetiqueChatenay-MalabryFrance
  3. 3.Department of Mechanical EngineeringYale UniversityNew HavenUSA

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