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Tissue Culture Conservation of Woody Species

  • Christopher P. Wilkins
  • John H. Dodds

Abstract

Over the last two decades, there has developed an increasing awareness of the necessity for the conservation of plant genetic resources. In the early 1960s, it became apparent that much of the priceless genetic diversity present both in primitive crop varieties and in related wild populations, was fast disappearing, due to the introduction of new, high-yielding cultivars. It was quickly realised that the spread of these highly-selected, uniform cultivars, together with new developments in agriculture, was threatening the existence of complex populations of primitive crop varieties. Such populations had evolved through cultivation over long periods of time and long exposure to environmental stresses, and by competing and introgressing with associated wild and weed species. Such processes of genetic erosion were also occurring in developing countries as a result of land clearance schemes for subsequent crop cultivation or urban development, and through the denudation of forests to provide timber for export or home use.

Keywords

Woody Species Date Palm Plant Genetic Resource Germ Plasm Maleic hydraZide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© John H. Dodds 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher P. Wilkins
  • John H. Dodds

There are no affiliations available

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