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Absorption, Silencers, Room Acoustics, and Transmission Loss

  • John E. K. Foreman

Abstract

In studying acoustic phenomena in enclosures, it is necessary to distinguish between sound absorbing materials (i.e., materials which absorb some of the energy in an incident sound wave and reduce reflections) and materials which reduce the transmission of sound through the materials. Allied with the absorption of a room is its reverberation characteristics, i.e., the rate at which sound decays in the room.

Keywords

Transmission Loss Sound Absorption Noise Control Octave Band Sound Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • John E. K. Foreman
    • 1
  1. 1.Sound and Vibration LaboratoryThe University of Western OntarioLondonCanada

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