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Instrumentation for Noise Measurement

  • John E. K. Foreman

Abstract

The instrumentation used for measuring noise may range from a simple sound-level meter to a sophisticated signal analysis processing system.

Keywords

Noise Measurement Sound Pressure Noise Source Sound Level Sound Field 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • John E. K. Foreman
    • 1
  1. 1.Sound and Vibration LaboratoryThe University of Western OntarioLondonCanada

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