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Abstract

The best place to begin an examination of masonry is in the study of one of the earliest and still used construction materials, mud brick. The difficulties, pitfalls, and virtues of masonry construction are reflected and made transparently clear in mud-brick construction since failings are so obvious. We also have the benefit of observing buildings and building methods that have been with us for a long time. Some say that mud bricks were first used at least three milleniums before the birth of Christ.

Keywords

Compressive Strength Masonry Wall Lightweight Aggregate Mortar Joint Masonry Unit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold Company Inc. 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Forrest Wilson

There are no affiliations available

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