Advertisement

Living in an Earth Shelter

  • Max R. Terman

Abstract

Because an earth shelter is airtight and made of earth-associated construction materials, it may seem to be a “closed-in” environment. However, if adequate daylighting and window space are provided, this need not be the case. Also, earth sheltered houses may accumulate more interior air pollutants than conventional homes. For this and other reasons, the occupants of earth shelters and other energy-efficient homes must be more aware of the state of the exterior and interior environment than those who live in open, aboveground dwellings. To maximize performance of an earth shelter, standard energy conservation practices and timely operational activities must be observed. This chapter will discuss possible problems with the earth shelter environment and their solutions.

Keywords

Radon Concentration Humidity Level Nitrogen Dioxide Radon Level Auxiliary Heating 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Boyer, L., W. Grondzik, and M. Weber. 1980. “Passive Energy Design and Habitability Aspects of Earth-Sheltered Housing in Oklahoma.” Underground Space, vol. 4, no. 6, 333–339.Google Scholar
  2. Boyer, L. and W. Grondzik. 1983a. “Comfort Assessment in Earth Covered Dwellings in the United States.” In L. Boyer, ed. Earth Shelter Protection. Stillwater, OK: Oklahoma State University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Boyer, L. and W. Grondzik. 1983b. “Energy Performance of Earth Covered Dwellings in the U.S.” In L. Boyer, ed. Earth Shelter Protection. Stillwater, OK: Oklahoma State University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Bruno, R. 1983. “Sources of Indoor Radon in Houses: A Review.” Journal of the Air Pollution Control Association, vol. 33, no. 2, 105–109.MathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  5. Brzezowski, E. and R. Kirchner. 1981. “Powerful Monitor is Simple, Inexpensive.” Solar Age, vol. 6, no. 8, 55–56.Google Scholar
  6. Feisel, L. 1980. “Monitoring System Defined.” Earth Shelter Living, vol. 9, 34–35.Google Scholar
  7. Fuller, W. 1981. “What’s in the Air for Tightly Built Houses?” Solar Age, vol. 6, no. 6, 30–32.Google Scholar
  8. Goldberg, L. 1983. “Underground Space Center: Monitoring Program.” Earth Shelter Living, vol. 29, 33–35.Google Scholar
  9. Holon, S., P. Kendall, S. Norsted, and D. Watson. 1980. “Psychological Responses to Earth-sheltered, Multilevel, and Aboveground Structures With and Without Windows.” Underground Space, vol. 5, no. 3, 171–178.Google Scholar
  10. Landa, E. 1983. “Radon Concentrations in the Indoor Air of Earth Sheltered Buildings in Colorado.” In L. Boyer, ed. Earth Shelter Protection. Stillwater, OK: Oklahoma State University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Lord, D. 1981. “Interior Environmental Quality in Earth Shelters.” In L. Boyer, ed. Earth Shelter Performance and Evaluation. Stillwater, OK: Oklahoma State University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Machowski, B. 1982a. “Oldest Fuel is Updated.” Earth Shelter Living, vol. 23, 10–11.Google Scholar
  13. Machowski, B. 1982b. “Solar Tax Credits.” Earth Shelter Living, vol. 7, 33–41.Google Scholar
  14. May, H. 1981. “Ionizing Radiation Levels in Energy-Conserving Structures.” Underground Space, vol. 5, no. 6, 384–391.Google Scholar
  15. McKown, C. and K. Stewart. 1980. “Consumer Attitudes Concerning Features of an Earth-Sheltered Dwelling.” Underground Space, vol. 4, no. 5, 293–295.Google Scholar
  16. Nero, A. 1983. “Radon in Energy-Efficient Earth Sheltered Structures.” In L. Boyer, ed. Earth Shelter Protection. Stillwater, OK: Oklahoma State University Press.Google Scholar
  17. Oswald, R. 1983. “Tight House Can Seal in Pollution.” Earth Shelter Living, vol. 27, 36–37.Google Scholar
  18. Paul, T. 1982. “How to Design a Remote Power System.” Solar Age, vol. 7, no. 10, 34–39.Google Scholar
  19. Pick, E. 1980. “Operations Characteristics of a Utility-Free Dwelling in Kansas.” In L. Boyer, ed. Earth Sheltered Building Design Innovations. Stillwater, OK: Oklahoma State University Press.Google Scholar
  20. Rand, G. 1981. “Think Ecologically About Indoor Environments.” Underground Space, vol. 6, no. 2, 105–108.Google Scholar
  21. Rollwagen, M., S. Taylor, and T. Holthusen. 1983. “Buying an Existing Earth-Sheltered Home.” Mother Earth News, vol. 83, 84–85.Google Scholar
  22. Seitz, D. 1983. “Reflecting on Photovoltaics.” Earth Shelter Living, vol. 30, 10–12.Google Scholar
  23. Selinfreund, M., R. Farrer, and P. Munding. 1983. “Monitoring an Earth-Sheltered Solar-Assisted House.” In L. Boyer, ed. Earth Shelter Protection. Stillwater, OK: Oklahoma State University Press.Google Scholar
  24. Shurcliff, W. 1980. Thermal Shutters and Shades. Andover, MA: Brick House.Google Scholar
  25. Shurcliff, W. 1983. Air-to-Air Heat Exchangers for Houses. Andover, MA: Brick House.Google Scholar
  26. Stickney, B. 1978. “The Homeowner’s System for Evaluating Passive Solar Heating.” Passive Systems ’78. Newark, DE: International Solar Energy Society.Google Scholar
  27. Vadnais, K. 1980. “Light of Financial Breaks Shines on Passive Solar.” Earth Shelter Living, vol. 7, 28–31.Google Scholar
  28. Vadnais, K. 1983. “Insurance Study Favors Earth Sheltering.” Earth Shelter Living, vol. 26, 26–28.Google Scholar
  29. Wadden, R. and P. Scheff. 1983. Indoor Air Pollution, Characterization, Prediction, and Control. New York: John Wiley and Sons.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold Company Inc. 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Max R. Terman

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations