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Site Evaluation and Selection

  • Max R. Terman

Abstract

The eventual success of an earth sheltered home depends on how well the building is integrated with its environment. With careful planning, the natural energy of the site’s microclimate can be used, reducing dependence on fossil fuels. If not, the building will fight the climate and be less efficient. In the words of Frank Lloyd Wright, “I think it far better to go with the natural climate than to try to fix a special artificial climate of your own.”

Keywords

Expansive Soil Heat Gain Site Evaluation Comfort Zone Expansive Clay 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold Company Inc. 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Max R. Terman

There are no affiliations available

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