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An Adaptive Approach to Housing Options

  • Max R. Terman

Abstract

The selection of a suitable energy-efficient home to build is not easy to make. More than money and energy savings are involved. There are also reasons of aesthetics, land use and environment, noise reduction, maintenance, and protection. Furthermore, no single housing strategy or technique will be best in all situations. Site conditions and climate may favor one design feature over another.

Keywords

Life Cycle Cost Adaptive Approach Thermal Mass Underground Space Housing Option 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold Company Inc. 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Max R. Terman

There are no affiliations available

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