Electrical Systems

  • John B. Liljedahl
  • Paul K. Turnquist
  • David W. Smith
  • Makoto Hoki


The design of electrical systems is very specialized. Components are rarely designed and manufactured by the tractor manufacturers but instead are purchased from vendors.


Diesel Engine Compression Ratio Engine Speed Electrical System Breaker Point 


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Suggested Reading

  1. Batcheller, B. D. “Integrated Electronic Tractor Controls.” Convergence 84 Proceedings. IEEE Catalog No. 84CHI988-5, Oct. 1984.Google Scholar
  2. Beresa, Jonas. “Applications of Microcomputers in Automotive Electronics.” IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics, vol. IE-30, no. 2, May 1983, p. 87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Bischel, Brian J. “The 4994 Tractor Steering and Transmission Control System.” Convergence 84. Proceeding of the International Congress on Transportation Electronics, Oct. 22–24, 1984.Google Scholar
  4. Chancellor, William J., and Nelson E. Smith. Tractor Engine Torque Transducer Using Throttle Position and RPM. ASAE Paper 85-1557, 1985.Google Scholar
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  6. Deere & Co. “Electrical Systems—Compact Equipment.” Fundamentals of Service, Moline, IL, 1982.Google Scholar
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  11. Howes, P., et al. “The Electronic Governing of Diesel Engines for the Agricultural Industry.” SAE Paper 860146, 1986.Google Scholar
  12. Kainz, A., et al. “A New Concept for Electronic Diesel Engine Control.” SAE Paper 860141, Feb. 1986.Google Scholar
  13. Moncelle, M. E., and G. C. Fortune. “Caterpillar 3406 PEEC (Programmable Electronic Engine Control).” SAE paper 850173, Feb. 1985.Google Scholar
  14. Mueller, G. R. “A Digital Instrumentation System for Agricultural Tractors.” SAE Paper No. 85-1113, 1985.Google Scholar
  15. Sokol, David G. “Radar II—A Microprocessor-Based Tire Ground Speed Sensor.” Paper no. 85-1081. Presented at the 1985 Summer Meeting of ASAE, June 23–26, 1985.Google Scholar
  16. Tooker, G. L. Semiconductor Technology—The Pervasiveness Continues.” Convergence’ 84 Proceedings. IEEE Catalog No. 84CH1988-5, Oct. 1984.Google Scholar
  17. Tschulena, G. R., and Seiders, M. “Sensor Technology in the Microelectronic Age.” Battelle Technical Inputs Report No. 40, 1984.Google Scholar
  18. Tsuha, W. K., et al. “Radar True Ground Sensor for Agricultural and Off Road Equipment.” SAE Paper 821059, Oct. 1982.Google Scholar
  19. “Vehicle Condition Monitoring and Fault Diagnosis.” Institution of Mechanical Engineers Proceedings, England, Mar. 1985.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • John B. Liljedahl
    • 1
  • Paul K. Turnquist
    • 2
  • David W. Smith
    • 3
  • Makoto Hoki
    • 4
  1. 1.Agricultural Engineering DepartmentPurdue UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Agricultural Engineering DepartmentAuburn UniversityUSA
  3. 3.Technical Center Deere & CompanyUSA
  4. 4.Department of Agricultural MachineryMie UniversityTsuJapan

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