Internal-Combustion Engine Cycles

  • John B. Liljedahl
  • Paul K. Turnquist
  • David W. Smith
  • Makoto Hoki

Abstract

Early internal-combustion engines were provided with a combustible charge that was ignited at atmospheric pressure. It was recognized as early as 1838 by Burnett (see Lichty 1967) that compression of the charge before combustion was advantageous, but not until 1862 did Beau de Rochas (Moyer et al. 1941), a Frenchman, set forth the fundamental principles underlying the practical and economical operation of the internal-combustion engine.

Keywords

Combustion Total Heat Diesel Otto Cycle 

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References

  1. Lichty, L. C. Combustion Engine Processes. McGraw-Hill, New York, 1967.Google Scholar
  2. Moyer, J. A., J. P. Calderwood, and A. A. Potter. Elements of Engineering Thermodynamics. Wiley, New York, 1941.Google Scholar

Suggested Reading

  1. Obert, E. F. Internal Combustion Engines and Air Pollution. Harper & Row, New York, 1973.Google Scholar
  2. Sneenden, J. B. and S. V. Kerr. Applied Heat for Engineers. International Ideas, Philadelphia, 1976.Google Scholar
  3. Taylor, C. F. The Internal Combustion Engine in Theory and Practice, vol. 1: Thermodynamics, Fluid Flow, and Performance, 2nd ed.; vol. 2: Combustion, Materials, Fuel, and Design. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1985.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • John B. Liljedahl
    • 1
  • Paul K. Turnquist
    • 2
  • David W. Smith
    • 3
  • Makoto Hoki
    • 4
  1. 1.Agricultural Engineering DepartmentPurdue UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Agricultural Engineering DepartmentAuburn UniversityUSA
  3. 3.Technical Center Deere & CompanyUSA
  4. 4.Department of Agricultural MachineryMie UniversityTsuJapan

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