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Land Capability Evaluation

  • Steven I. Gordon

Abstract

Thus far, we have reviewed models which are very site specific in their focus. Even if they are used for regional evaluations, they must begin with site specific data at a fairly large scale. Model outputs are also very explicit, being predictive and deterministic. Thus, given a particular environmental policy, a particular action can be evaluated to determine if the standards set are going to be met. The subject of this chapter is a set of methods that are entirely different in focus. These methods tend to be regional in orientation, broad in scope, and very subjective at the policy decision points.

Keywords

Capability Analysis Environmental Planning Numerical Taxonomy Policy Decision Point Landscape Architecture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold Company Inc. 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven I. Gordon
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of City and Regional PlanningThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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