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Motion in Tall Buildings

  • Andy W. Irwin

Abstract

For many years engineers, architects, and planners have struggled with structural, esthetic, amenity, social, and service problems concerning tall buildings. Considerable advances have been made in understanding and solving whole areas of difficulty but often these solutions reveal latent problems that were previously masked by other factors or that are introduced by the changes in practice. The constant endeavor by designers and researchers to provide economic solutions to problems involving tall building structures and long span floors has led to the introduction of a selection of slender and lightweight structural forms, which often incorporate newly introduced high strength materials. These structures, although not normally prone to any excessive deflections, stresses, fatigue or other forms of damage, are generally more dynamically responsive than their predecessors such that perceptible motion of overall buildings can be caused by wind storms and sometimes by everyday wind forces. Perceptible vibration of individual floor spans can also be a regular occurrence and may even be continuous in some cases.

Keywords

Human Response Motion Sickness Motion Perception Tall Building International Standard Organization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold Company Inc. 1988

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  • Andy W. Irwin

There are no affiliations available

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