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Definition of Wind Pressure on Tall Buildings

  • W. H. Melbourne

Abstract

Design pressures for cladding elements on tall buildings, in particular glass, have undergone a minor revolution in the past decade. Pressures of 1 kPa (20 psf) thought to be sufficient in many parts of the world up to 1960 have given way progressively to design pressures typically between 2 and 3 kPa on tall buildings. This has been brought about by the combination of the knowledge of existence of higher pressures from wind tunnel model tests in scaled turbulent boundary layer flows and from the cladding failures that have occurred on a number of tall buildings.

Keywords

Wind Speed Pressure Coefficient Wind Loading Tall Building Wind Pressure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References/Bibliography

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold Company Inc. 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. H. Melbourne

There are no affiliations available

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