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Design of Glass Against Breakage

  • Joseph E. Minor

Abstract

Window glass breakage has become a sensitive subject for skyscraper designers, owners, and insurers. Once a minor nuisance handled by routine maintenance, now broken window glass may significantly damage building contents, instigate personal injury claims, and produce adverse publicity for building owners and designers. In addition, the once simple task of selecting a window from among a few clear glass products has become an arduous task involving structural mechanics, polymer chemistry, thermodynamics, ceramic science, coating technology, and hazards analysis. Finally, the modern skyscraper is within a city and houses a community within itself, making cladding performance in hurricanes, earthquakes, and other extreme events an important concern for public safety.

Keywords

Window Glass Building Envelope Glass Product Wind Engineer Interstory Drift 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References/Bibliography

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold Company Inc. 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph E. Minor

There are no affiliations available

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