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Contaminant Sources

  • Alvin Lieberman

Abstract

Contaminant sources include almost every component in the manufacturing process: people, materials, processing equipment, and manufacturing environments. People can generate contaminating particles, gases, condensible vapors, and viable materials. People can also generate electrical charges and transport charged surfaces to critical areas. In most cleanroom operations, personnel interaction with the product is universal. However, the problems of maintaining uniform processing operations have resulted in the introduction of many robots for repetitive parts-handling steps in critical areas. The materials brought into the manufacturing process area can contribute particles, gases and vapors, and/or electrostatic charges. Even careful cleaning procedures have not completely solved this problem. Process equipment and tools used in production can also produce contaminating particles, gases and vapors, electrostatic charge, or vibration. The manufacturing environment can be a source of all of the contaminants that may cause problems. As product requirements change, the contamination control needs for those products also change. The importance of the several sources of contamination changes in order of concern as control techniques change in response to product changes.

Keywords

Particle Generation Manufacturing Environment Organic Vapor Contaminant Source Contamination Control 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alvin Lieberman

There are no affiliations available

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