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Gas Sampling Considerations

  • Alvin Lieberman

Abstract

Gas sampling is carried out to measure the quality of a gas. Gas samples are sometimes acquired by in situ observation within the main gas body by using remote or visual observation for specific properties. A more frequent method of sampling consists of removing a portion of the gas from the main body and transporting it to a location where the pertinent properties of the gas can be defined. These properties may be physical properties, such as temperature or pressure; they may be the chemical properties of gas itself or of it’s impurity content. In cleanroom applications, the particulate content of the gas is of major importance. Because particles are not uniformly distributed in the gas, sampling problems in defining these materials are atypical as compared to those for sample handling to define other properties of a gas. Sampling for particle content is discussed in some detail here.

Keywords

Aerosol Sampling Stokes Number Particle Loss Airborne Bacterium Optical Particle Counter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alvin Lieberman

There are no affiliations available

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