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Personnel Selection and Training

  • Alvin Lieberman

Abstract

Normal manufacturing produces products with a yield that approaches 100%. The products that are made can operate with some manufacturing debris and contamination deposited within the product, but these materials do not seriously affect the quality of the product. The requirements of the product types produced in most cleanrooms are significantly different. The cleanroom products are usually high-technology objects that are affected by even the smallest particulate contaminants that deposit upon the product. Scores of such products require cleanroom fabrication. They vary in dimensions from 80m laser fusion targets to aerospace devices many meters long. Many cleanroom products are produced with yields that are much less than those in normal fabrication processes. In some semiconductor areas, acceptable yield is less than 25%. The cost of repairing a semiconductor chip with short circuits or open circuits is very high. In many situations, a contaminated product cannot be repaired or recovered for use. The critical products cannot be contaminated during the fabrication process.

Keywords

Clean Room Semiconductor Manufacturing Clean Area Clean Glove Work Habit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alvin Lieberman

There are no affiliations available

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