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HVAC Filter and Flow Control Systems for Cleanrooms

  • Alvin Lieberman

Abstract

In any cleanroom, the HVAC (heating, ventilating, and air conditioning) system, the air filters, and the airflow controls are crucial to good operation. The HVAC system must be capable of providing a uniform flow of conditioned air at sufficient velocity and pressure to overcome the airflow resistance of the air ducts, air conditioning components, and filters. Very large airflow is required for modern-day cleanrooms. Even for a mixed-flow class 100,000 cleanroom, sufficient airflow to provide 20 to 30 air changes per hour may be required. A mixed-flow cleanroom that is 50 feet wide and 100 feet deep with a 10-foot ceiling requires a blower system capable of providing at least 17,000 cubic feet per minute airflow for this air change rate. The airflow should be provided at a pressure at least 0.5 inches water above ambient to assure maintenance of positive pressure in the cleanroom and to overcome the pressure drop of the filters and the HVAC components. A vertical unidirectional flow cleanroom of the same size requires a much larger blower system. For a 5,000-square-foot room with 100% filter ceiling, the airflow requirement is 450,000 cubic feet per minute for the 90-feet-per-minute air velocity specified for such cleanrooms. Energy costs just to operate the blowers to provide this airflow make up an important part of cleanroom costs.

Keywords

Clean Room HVAC System Butterfly Valve Flow Control System Damp Control 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alvin Lieberman

There are no affiliations available

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