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Verification and Monitoring: Requirements and Procedures

  • Alvin Lieberman

Abstract

When a cleanroom is first installed or any significant changes take place in its operation, the air cleanliness level should be verified. Once work operations begin in the room, monitoring is required to observe the status of a number of conditions in the room that are related to contamination generation and control. Many of the procedures for cleanroom monitoring are described in IES RP-006, Recommended Practice for Testing Clean Rooms (1984). The procedures for verification of the cleanroom classification, given in FS209D, have been discussed in the previous chapter.

Keywords

Particle Concentration Airborne Particle Clean Room Sound Level Meter Contamination Control 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alvin Lieberman

There are no affiliations available

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