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Dairy Products

  • Giorgio Ottogalli
  • Giulio Testolin

Abstract

Information concerning production and consumption of dairy products in the Mediterranean area in ancient times has come mainly from Greece, Rome, and Etruria (Istituto Poligrafico e Zecca dello Stato 1987; Erkahof-Stork 1976).

Keywords

Lactic Acid Bacterium Dairy Product Milk Protein Mediterranean Country Whey Cheese 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Giorgio Ottogalli
  • Giulio Testolin

There are no affiliations available

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