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Materials Handling

  • Eugene L. Magad
  • John M. Amos
Part of the Chapman & Hall Materials Management/Logistics Series book series (COMMS)

Abstract

Materials handling is not a new endeavor. The first humans who inhabitated the earth were faced with the problem of transporting both themselves and the materials needed for their existence. The movement of materials is basic to all business and personal activities. Through the years people have learned to apply mechanical principles such as the wheel, lever, and inclined plane to provide for easier, faster, and safer movement. Basically, materials handling is the art and science of implementing movement in an economical and safe manner. Industrial focus upon materials handling did not develop until the early 1900s. Materials handling has affected working people more than any other area of work design.1

Keywords

Material Flow Material Handling Unit Load Material Handling System Order Picking 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eugene L. Magad
    • 1
  • John M. Amos
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Materials/Logistics ManagementWilliam Rainey Harper CollegeUSA
  2. 2.Industrial and Manufacturing Systems EngineeringKansas State UniversityUSA
  3. 3.Engineering ManagementUniversity of Missouri-RollaUSA

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