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The ecology of indigenous populations of Rhizobium leguminosarum bvs. trifolii and viceae

  • P. J. Bottomley
  • K. Leung
  • S. R. Strain
  • K. Yak
  • N. Dashti
  • P. Claycomb

Abstract

Although competitive nodulation has been studied for many years (1,3,5,7,8), it has been difficult to gain an understanding of what biological and abiological factors control the outcome of this phenomenon in natural soils containing native rhizobial populations. An issue which has received considerable attention is concerned with the debate about whether differences in saprophytic competence exist among members of soil rhizobial populations. If such differences occur, can they affect the outcome of competitive nodulation by influencing the sizes and physiological states of subpopulations? The alternate scenario is that particular rhizobial strains within the soil population are ‘preferred’ as microsymbionts by the host. As a result, differences in population size and free-living saprophytic attributes are relegated to minor roles in the affairs of competitive nodulation.

Keywords

Soil Population Rhizobial Population Nodule Occupancy Clover Species Electrophoretic Type 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Routledge, Chapman & Hall, Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. J. Bottomley
    • 1
  • K. Leung
    • 1
  • S. R. Strain
    • 1
  • K. Yak
    • 1
  • N. Dashti
    • 1
  • P. Claycomb
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology, and Department of Crop and Soil ScienceOregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA

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