Advertisement

Issues of Scale in Conservation Biology

  • Reed F. Noss

Abstract

So often, the solution to a problem is overlooked because it requires a fundamentally different way of looking at things. Once the problem is seen in a new light, the resolution is obvious, and we wonder how we could have ever been so stupid. Is it possible to identify “new lights” at the outset, and then proceed to determine which might best illuminate the problem at hand?

Keywords

Conservation Biology Natural Disturbance Patch Dynamic Animal Liberation Natural Disturbance Regime 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Literature Cited

  1. Allen, T.F.H., Starr, T.B. 1982. Hierarchy: Perspectives for ecological complexity. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  2. Bormann, F.H., Likens, G.E. 1979. Pattern and process in a forested ecosystem. New York: Springer-Verlag.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Callicott, J.B. 1980. Animal liberation: A triangular affair. Environ. Ethics 2: 311–38.Google Scholar
  4. Callicott, J.B. 1986. On the intrinsic value of nonhuman species. In The preservation of species: The value of biological diversity, ed. B.G. Norton, 138–72. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Callicott, J.B. 1987. The conceptual foundations of the land ethic. In Companion to a Sand County Almanac: Interpretive and critical essays, ed. J.B. Callicott, 186–217. Madison: University of Wiscons in Press.Google Scholar
  6. Cooper, W.S. 1913. The climax forest of Isle Royale, Lake Superior, and its development. Bot. Gaz. 55:1–44, 115–140, 189–235.Google Scholar
  7. Darwin, C. 1871. The descent of man and selection in relation to sex. London: Murray.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Davis, M.B. 1981. Quaternary history and the stability of forest communities. In Forest succession: Concepts and applications, ed. D.C. West, H.H. Shugart, and D.B. Botkin, 132–53. New York: Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  9. Ehrlich, P., and A. Ehrlich. 1981. Extinction: The causes and consequences of the disappearance of species. New York: Random House.Google Scholar
  10. Frankel, O.H., Soulé, M.E. 1981. Conservation and evolution. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Hunter, M.L., Jacobson, G.L., Webb, T. 1988. Paleoecology and the coarse- filter approach to maintaining biological diversity. Cons. Biol. 2: 375–85.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Kellert, S.R. 1986. Social and perceptual factors in the preservation of animal species. In The preservation of species: The value of biological diversity, ed. B.G. Norton, 50–73. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  13. Lennartz, M. 1989. Reply to Edward C. Fritz. Nat. Areas J. 9: 4.Google Scholar
  14. Leopold, A. 1949. A Sand County almanac. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Means, D.B. 1987. Impacts on diversity of the 1985 Land and Resource Management Plan for National Forests in Florida. Report to The Wilderness Society. Washington, D.C.: The Wilderness Society.Google Scholar
  16. Menges, E.S. 1988. Conservation biology of Furbish’s lousewort. Final report to Region 5, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Indianapolis: Holcomb Research Institute, Butler University.Google Scholar
  17. Naess, A. 1986. Intrinsic value: Will the defenders of nature please rise? In Conservation biology: The science of scarcity and diversity, ed. M.E. Soulé, 504–15. Sunderland, Mass.: Sinauer.Google Scholar
  18. Naess, A. 1989. Ecology, community, and lifestyle: Outline of an ecosophy. Translated and revised by D. Rothenberg. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Nash, R.F. 1989. The rights of nature: A history of environmental ethics. Madison: University of Wiscons in Press.Google Scholar
  20. Noss, R.F. 1983. A regional landscape approach to maintain diversity. Bioscience 33: 700–6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Noss, R.F. 1987. From plant communities to landscapes in conservation inventories: A look at The Nature Conservancy (USA). Biol. Cons. 41: 11–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Noss, R.F. 1991. From endangered species to biodiversity. In Balancing on the brink: A retrospective on the Endangered Species Act, ed. K.A. Kohm, 227–46. Washington, D.C.: Island Press.Google Scholar
  23. Noss, R.F., Harris, L.D. 1986. Nodes, networks, and MUMs: Preserving diversity at all scales. Environ. Manage. 10: 299–309.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Noss, R.F., Harris, L.D. 1990. Habitat connectivity and the conservation of biological diversity: Florida as a case study. In Proceedings of the 1989 Society of American Foresters Conference, 24–27 September 1989, Spokane, Wash., 131–35. Bethesda, Md.: Society of American Foresters.Google Scholar
  25. O’Neill, R.V., DeAngelis, D.L., Waide, J.B., Allen, T.F.H. 1986. A hierarchical concept of ecosystems. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  26. Peters, R.L. 1988. Effects of global warming on species and habitats: An overview. Endang. Spec. Update 5: 1–8.Google Scholar
  27. Pickett, S.T.A., Thompson, J.N. 1978. Patch dynamics and the size of nature reserves. Biol. Cons. 13: 27–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Pickett, S.T.A., White, P.S. eds. 1985. The ecology of natural disturbance and patch dynamics. Orlando, Fla.: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  29. Platt, W.J., Evans, G.W., Rathbun, S.L. 1988. The population dynamics of a long-lived conifer. Am. Nat. 131: 491–525.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Rabinowitz, D., Cairns, S., Dillon, T. 1986. Seven forms of rarity and their frequency in the flora of the British Isles. In Conservation biology: The science of scarcity and diversity, ed. M.E. Soulé, 182–204. Sunderland, Mass.: Sinauer.Google Scholar
  31. Ricklefs, R.E. 1987. Community diversity: Relative roles of local and regional processes. Science 235: 167–71.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Runkle, J.R. 1985. Disturbance regimes in temperate forests. In The ecology of natural disturbance and patch dynamics, ed. S.T.A. Pickett and P. S. White, 17–33. Orlando, Fla.: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  33. Samson, F.B., Knopf, F.L. 1982. In search of a diversity ethic for wildlife management. Trans. N. Am. Wildl. Nat. Res. Conf. 47: 421–31.Google Scholar
  34. Scott, J.M., Csuti, B., Smith, K., Estes, J.E., Caicco, S. 1991. Gap analysis of species richness and vegetation cover: An integrated conservation strategy for the preservation of biological diversity. In Balancing on the brink: A retrospective on the Endangered Species Act, ed. K.A. Kohm, 282–97. Washinton, D.C.: Island Press.Google Scholar
  35. Shugart, H.H., West, D.C. 1981. Long-term dynamics of forest ecosystems. Am. Sci. 69: 647–52.Google Scholar
  36. Soulé, M.E., ed. 1987. Viable populations for conservation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  37. Wiens, J.A., Addicott, J.F., Case, T.J., Diamond, J. 1986. Overview: The importance of spatial and temporal scale in ecological investigations. In Community ecology, ed. J. Diamond and T.J. Case, 145–53. New York: Harper & Row.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Routledge, Chapman & Hall, Inc. and Diane C. Fiedler 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Reed F. Noss

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations