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Threats to Invertebrate Biodiversity: Implications for Conservation Strategies

  • John E. HafernikJr.

Abstract

Traditionally, conservation efforts have been directed at saving large vertebrates and their habitats. There is increasing awareness, however, of threats to invertebrates and concern about detrimental effects of loss of invertebrate diversity. I summarize the geographic distribution of extinct and threatened U.S. invertebrates, discuss reasons for recent extinctions, and comment on the role invertebrates should play in conservation strategies. Areas of great endemism are also areas of greater observed and potential extinctions. These include (1) Hawaii, (2) California, (3) large eastern river systems, and (4) subterranean caves. Several examples of successful efforts to conserve endangered invertebrates are provided. The preservation of small remaining parcels of native habitat even in urban areas can help maintain invertebrate diversity. The chapter concludes with suggestions for ways that studies of invertebrate diversity can contribute to theories of reserve design and habitat restoration.

Keywords

Conservation Biology American Chestnut Reserve Design Invertebrate Diversity Blue Butterfly 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Routledge, Chapman & Hall, Inc. and Diane C. Fiedler 1992

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  • John E. HafernikJr.

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