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The Role of Ecological Restoration in Conservation Biology

  • Laura L. Jackson

Abstract

It is hard to imagine the sense of vacancy that exists in a place where nature has been completely removed, not just for city blocks, but for thousands of square miles. While attending college in Iowa, my friends and I would borrow a car and make the ten-mile pilgrimage to Turner Station, one of the handful of prairies left in southeastern Iowa. By accident and luck, the railroad right-of-way had protected a strip of unturned sod 6 m wide and 30 m long. Kneeling, we would search for single specimens of once-common forbs pushing up through the tall grasses and the thick mat of leaf litter. The prairie was infested with sumac, buckthorn, and tree seedlings because it had not burned in over ten years, and we worried that it would soon disappear entirely.

Keywords

Natural Regeneration Conservation Biology Ecological Restoration Forested Wetland Mine Spoil 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Routledge, Chapman & Hall, Inc. and Diane C. Fiedler 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laura L. Jackson

There are no affiliations available

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