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From Conservation Biology to Conservation Practice: Strategies for Protecting Plant Diversity

  • Donald A. Falk

Abstract

This chapter explores linkages between studies of the biology of rare plants and strategies for their conservation. Because of their low numbers and consequent vulnerability to destruction, rare plant species provide an important test of the current state of the art in conservation, particularly important in an era of biological management. The primary threats and patterns of endangerment to the flora of the United States are summarized, with special reference to causes of decline beyond outright destruction of habitat. The chapter addresses the major biological considerations in rare plant conservation and management, including endemism and narrow distribution, and demographic or genetic effects in small populations. Finally, integrated strategies for rare plant conservation are discussed, emphasizing the interactions among land conservation, biological management, offsite research and propagation, and introduction and habitat restoration. A bibliography on rare plant biology and conservation is also provided.

Keywords

Rare Species Endangered Species Conservation Biology Conservation Practice Rare Plant 
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© Routledge, Chapman & Hall, Inc. and Diane C. Fiedler 1992

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  • Donald A. Falk

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