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Abstract

This chapter covers the application of lasers to the shaping of materials. Two approaches are described: laser-assisted machining (LAM), in which the laser heats material as it is sheared by a single-point cutting tool with the objective of improving its machinability; and laser machining (LM), in which the laser heats and vaporizes material. The former is applied to metallic materials, while the latter is applied to nitrides and carbides. Current interest in these approaches is prompted by the development of high-power CO2 and Nd-YAG infrared lasers with sufficient ruggedness, reliability, and simplicity of operation for use as directed-energy heat sources in manufacturing facilities.

Keywords

Material Removal Rate Shear Plane Laser Heating Laser Application Rake Face 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chapman and Hall 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen M. Copley
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Materials Science and Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of Southern CaliforniaUSA

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