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Strategy Instruction: Programming for Independent Study Skill Usage

  • William D. Bursuck
  • Madhavi Jayanthi

Abstract

As persons with learning disabilities (LDs) are enrolling in postsecondary education in ever-increasing numbers, there is disturbing evidence that many of these students are having difficulty staying in and completing these programs (Sitlington & Frank, 1990). One contributing factor to this problem is the fact that postsecondary classrooms require an extensive repertoire of independent learning skills. As Dalke and Schmitt (1987) pointed out, the demands of college environments are quite different from those of high school. Indeed, they are characterized by a significant decrease in student-teacher contacts, by greater academic competition, and, in general, by a less protective environment. Furthermore, college courses appear to require a much higher level of reading, writing, listening, and verbal interactive skills, areas in which students with learning disabilities have been shown to have a deficit (Houck, Engelhard, & Geller, 1989; Mangrum & Strichart, 1988). Certainly, postsecondary service providers will need to teach their students with learning disabilities these most important independent learning skills.

Keywords

College Student Learn Disability Strategy Usage Independent Learning Study Skill 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • William D. Bursuck
  • Madhavi Jayanthi

There are no affiliations available

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