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The Integration of Remediation and Subject-Matter Tutoring: Support at the College Level

  • Pamela B. Adelman
  • Jody O’Connell
  • Dee Konrad
  • Susan A. Vogel

Abstract

The increased awareness of the chronicity of learning disabilities (LDs) emphasizes the need for ongoing assistance for students with LDs at the postsecondary level. Even among students capable of attending college, their persistent processing difficulties and resulting underachievement have affected academic progress in reading, written language, and mathematics (Vogel, 1986; Vogel & Adelman, 1990). Nationwide, colleges and universities have recognized the needs of college students with learning disabilities and have developed services and programs to help them succeed in spite of their deficits.

Keywords

Reading Comprehension Learning Disability Learn Disability Math Skill Individual Education Plan 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pamela B. Adelman
  • Jody O’Connell
  • Dee Konrad
  • Susan A. Vogel

There are no affiliations available

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