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Memory of Action Events: Some Implications for Memory Theory and for Imagery

  • Johannes Engelkamp

Abstract

Memory of simple action events was not studied before the eighties. But once this research was started, it gained continuously in interest (e.g. Bäckman, 1985; Bäckman, Nilsson & Chalom, 1985; Cohen, 1983, 1984; Engelkamp & Krumnacker, 1980; Engelkamp & Zimmer, 1983; Helstrup, 198’7, 1989; Nilsson & Cohen, 1988; Saltz, 1988; Saltz & Dixon, 1982; Zimmer & Engelkamp, 1984; 1985).

Keywords

Free Recall Motor Process Dual Code Noun Pair Verbal Encode 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1991

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  • Johannes Engelkamp

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